Jane Eyre at the National Theatre review

by Sonali Dutta

This review contains spoilers for the novel Jane Eyre

Charlotte Bronte’s Jane Eyre is a much loved novel for many of us. As well as having read the book, it’s just as likely that we’ve seen an adaptation such as the 2011 film. Sally Cookson directs this performance which was first shown at Bristol Old Vic and now returns to the National Theatre following a UK tour.

The ensemble, with Nadia Clifford as Jane Eyre

Photograph by Brinkhoff/Mögenburg

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Wind River review

Non-spoiler.

by Sonali Dutta

At the beginning of Wind River, the audience sees a frightened young woman (played by Kelsey Asbille) running in heavy snow. Who is she and what is she running away from in such harsh conditions? Local tracker Cory, who normally hunts wild animals on farms, shortly discover her mutilated corpse frozen solid. The film is set in Wind River, a Native American reservation in snowy Wyoming. Taylor Sheridan, who wrote Hell and High Water and Sicario, wrote and directed this film, which is based on true events.

Cold case … Elizabeth Olsen and Jeremy Renner in Wind River.

Image by Allstar/Voltage Pictures

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Mosquitoes at the National Theatre review

by Sonali Dutta

Mosquitoes ia a new play by Lucy Kirkwood, set in 2008 and directed by Rufus Norris. The play explores relationship between two clashing sisters, Jenny played by Olivia Coleman and Alice played by Olivia Williams. Alice is an exceptionally clever scientist at CERN who has spent more than a decade working on the Large Hadron Collider to look for the Higgs Boson. In contrast, Jenny is pegged as the “stupid one” and prefers to read horoscopes in magazines rather than look at facts. As Jenny herself says, she is the “Forest Gump” to Alice’s genius “Wizard of Oz”. Much of the action is set in Geneva during the run up to the Large Hadron Collider being launched.

Olivia Williams and Olivia Colman in Mosquitoes at the National Theatre, London. Photo: Tristram Kenton

Photograph by Tristram Kenton

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Into the Unknown: A Journey Through Science Fiction at the Barbican Centre

by Sonali Dutta

Science fiction may be seen as a niche interest or a modern genre. However, the Barbican Centre’s Into the Unknown exhibition shows the breadth and depth of this diverse area. Into the Unknown demonstrates science fiction’s earliest origins in literature and painting, moving towards the familiar films and comic books. The Barbican also commissioned Conrad Shawcross to create a new piece for the exhibtion called In Light of The Machine. Into the Unknown also provides the context of the works it showcases. Into the Unknown is curated by writer and historian Patrick Gyger and features more than 800 works from across the globe.

Photograph by Antonia Kerridge

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Yo! Sushi School

by Sonali Dutta

Sushi is really popular these days, with chains such as Yo! Sushi and Itsu across the country. You can even pick up box of sushi in your local supermarket. Sushi can ofen be a healthy choice, especially when opting for fish or vegetable-based types. As sushi is one of my favourite types of food, I was really excited to take part in a sushi making class offered by Yo! Sushi. You need to book in advance and can either pay on the day or use a voucher from a supplier (like Buy a Gift for example). A class costs £30 for one person or £50 for two. You don’t need to bring anything along as Yo! provide all the ingredients and equipment needed, including gloves.

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Ingredients for the class ready to go.

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Their Finest film review

by Sonali Dutta.

Non-spoiler review.

Set in the Second World during the Blitz, Their Finest is a deliciously heartwarming and rousing piece. Catrin Cole (Gemma Arterton) initially needs to earn money to support her artist husband Ellis. The British government is aware that morale is ebbing and so plans to boost spirits with public information short propaganda films. Applying for what she assumes is a secretarial post, Catrin is tasked to work on films writing women’s dialogue (or “slop”). The film is based on Lissa Evans’s 2009 novel Their Finest Hour and a Half (which flows better as a title). The adapatation by Gaby Chiappe is directed by Lone Scherfig, who also directed 2009’s An Education.

Their Finest 2

Image by Nicola Dove

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Ballet Black Triple Bill at the Barbican

by Sonali Dutta

Ballet Black is a ballet company of dancers of black and Asian descent. Relatively new, Ballet Black was started in 2001 by Cassa Pancho with the aim to provide opportunities for ethnic minority dancers. There is more information available about the company’s history here and an article about members of the company here. This performance at the Barbican in London is the premiere of their new Triple Bill: The House of DreamsCaptured and a new take on Red Riding Hood.

Photograph by Tristram Kenton

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